telesilla:

nevver:

Happy Labor Day

Never forget that people died for the worker’s rights we enjoy today. And if, for even a moment, you think we don’t need them now, just think about the employers who short their workers by one hour so they don’t have to offer health insurance. Think of the companies that fight the idea of giving their workers a living wage. Think of Walmart saying that their workers should apply for government assistance if they can’t make it on their shitty salaries.
My sister and I both did the same job—processing insurance claims—for different companies. Even though my job required more knowledge, she was getting a significantly larger paycheck because she was union. It’s not just industrial or service workers who benefit from strong unions.
Happy Labor Day!

telesilla:

nevver:

Happy Labor Day

Never forget that people died for the worker’s rights we enjoy today. And if, for even a moment, you think we don’t need them now, just think about the employers who short their workers by one hour so they don’t have to offer health insurance. Think of the companies that fight the idea of giving their workers a living wage. Think of Walmart saying that their workers should apply for government assistance if they can’t make it on their shitty salaries.

My sister and I both did the same job—processing insurance claims—for different companies. Even though my job required more knowledge, she was getting a significantly larger paycheck because she was union. It’s not just industrial or service workers who benefit from strong unions.

Happy Labor Day!

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman
1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.
2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”
4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.
5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poems, comic books, and films.
6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events. 

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.
But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

strugglingtobeheard:

atriptothemorg:

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

Six Facts About Harriet Tubman

1. Harriet Tubman’s birth name was Aramita (“Minty”) Ross. She was born enslaved in Maryland sometime in 1820.

2. Tubman escaped slavery with her brother, Ben and Harry, on September 17, 1849.

Harriet_Tubman_Reward_Notice_1849.jpg

3. Tubman is most famous for her role as a conductor on the Underground Railroad, in which she led escaped slaves to freedom. Estimates vary, but Tubman is said to have helped anywhere from dozens to hundreds of slaves reach freedom. She was once quoted as saying, “I freed a thousand slaves. I could have freed a thousand more if only they knew they were slaves.”

4. During the Civil War, Tubman worked for the Union army as a cook, nurse, and spy. She was also the first woman to lead an expedition in the war and guided the Combahee River Raid, which freed 700 slaves. Decades later, the raid would inspire a groundbreaking group of black feminists called the Combahee River Collective.

5. Tubman’s life has inspired countless works for art, including poemscomic books, and films.

6. This year marks that 100th anniversary of Harriet Tubman’s death. Maryland has a series of commemorative events

The last one really hits me. She had only been dead for 100 years. 100 years. Like, white folks are going on and on about how slavery has been over for hundreds and hundreds of years.

But here is an escaped slave who liberated countless others that only died ONE HUNDRED YEARS ago. This is not the ancient past. This is still living history.

^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^

violencegirl:

aint-got-nothin-at-all:

boobsbirdsbotany:


Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.
From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color. 

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

!!!!!!!!

Painting a more accurate version of history, one reblog at a time.
When I posted this archival image of a “real life Rosie the Riveter” one year ago, I had no idea it would resonate with so many people. 19K and counting. 

violencegirl:

aint-got-nothin-at-all:

boobsbirdsbotany:

Real life “Rosie the Riveter” - Tennessee, 1943.

From the Library of Congress collection, 1930’s-1940’s in Color

GLORIFY THE SHIT OUT OF THIS IMAGE

!!!!!!!!

Painting a more accurate version of history, one reblog at a time.

When I posted this archival image of a “real life Rosie the Riveter” one year ago, I had no idea it would resonate with so many people. 19K and counting. 

dreadpiratekhan:

A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  
(freakin’ immaculate)
Source with more wonderful photos

dreadpiratekhan:


A Swedish woman hitting a neo-Nazi protester with her handbag. The woman was reportedly a concentration camp survivor. [1985]

Volunteers learn how to fight fires at Pearl Harbor [c. 1941 - 1945]

A 106-year old Armenian woman protecting her home with an AK-47. [1990]

Komako Kimura, a prominent Japanese suffragist at a march in New York. [October 23, 1917]

Erika, a 15-year-old Hungarian fighter who fought for freedom against the Soviet Union. [October 1956]

Sarla Thakral, 21 years old, the first Indian woman to earn a pilot license. [1936]

Voting activist Annie Lumpkins at the Little Rock city jail. [1961]  

(freakin’ immaculate)

Source with more wonderful photos

Why The Holocaust Is Taught So Heavily In American Schools

aka14kgold:

bipolarbubbeleh:

bunmer:

returnofthejudai:

The reason American education talks about the Holocaust so much is because it makes them seem like big heroes during WWII. The Nazis were evil on such a historic scale that virtually ANYONE would look like true blue…

drwholvr:


101st-analborne:

fallbeil:

mugenstyle:

eccecorinna:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.
their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever



pilots (◡‿◡✿) 
girl pilots (◕‿◕✿)
girl pilots killing nazis ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* \(◕ヮ◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

But, remember, women never did anything in history.

I’m reblogging this again. Always reblogging. Always

drwholvr:

101st-analborne:

fallbeil:

mugenstyle:

eccecorinna:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.

their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever

pilots (◡‿◡✿) 

girl pilots (◕◕✿)

girl pilots killing nazis ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* \(◕◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

But, remember, women never did anything in history.

I’m reblogging this again. Always reblogging. Always

diae:

sarahfonseca:

The next time you see someone with jewelry that says “trust no man,” don’t judge them for their “man hating” or “bougie” ways. Rather, commend them for their superb taste in music.

“Trust no man” is actually a reference to a reference to a 1926 song of the same name by Gertrude “Ma” Rainey, a Georgian and African-American pioneer of blues music. 

I want all you women to listen to me

Don’t trust your man no further than your eyes can see

I trusted my man with my best friend

But that was a bad bargain in the end

A feminist before there was really a term for it, Rainey was also notorious for getting into trouble with small-town authorities over her “women-only parties.” She was a brazen lady-lovin’ badass well-worthy of a 21st century signal boost.

Ma Rainey literally had a song Prove it On Me Blues where she pretty much said “I’m a big fat lesbian but you’re never going to catch me and if you dont think thats some of the dopest shit i dont wanna talk to you

teacupnosaucer:

awenyddogamulosx:

ruthlesswoodcarver:

mothensidhe:

fatfury:

omgxchrissy:

cumleak:

deux-zero-deux:

demands-with-menace:

Queen Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt. She has a lovely smile for someone who’s been dead for thousands of years.

she wasn’t a queen. she was a pharaoh and wanted to be referred to as such. she even had her statues modeled after the male pharaoh’s statues to state her dominance and authority. she was actually one of the most successful pharaohs in all of ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman in power in egypt.

damn no wonder she died and smiled for a trillion years afterwards

The fact that we know about her is marvelous.
the next Pharaoh after her Tuthmosis III  tried to erase Hatshepsut out of history ,chiseled her name off her monuments ,covered the text on her obelisks with stone,knocked down and defaced her statues .
she was even left off the list of pharaohs ..talk about some patriarchy bullshit
her name was lost for a couple of millennia, her body was found in a unmarked grave  in early twentieth century
sad part is in Egyptian belief is  if your are forgotten in the living world you don’t exist in the afterlife,so he was trying to kill her even in death 

My best friend throwing down some herstory. A+ commentary

She wore a fake beard, you guys.She was the fucking boss.

If we remember her now does that save her from an awful afterlife?

I’m just picturing the Kemetic afterlife. All the Pharaohs are hanging out in some kind of swanky club, drinking and congratulating each other on being bros. 
The doors slam open and Hatshepsut strides in, glorious, robes swirling, rocking the fake beard and the insane amounts of wealth and power. “Miss me, bitches?” 

this post was amazing from start to finish

teacupnosaucer:

awenyddogamulosx:

ruthlesswoodcarver:

mothensidhe:

fatfury:

omgxchrissy:

cumleak:

deux-zero-deux:

demands-with-menace:

Queen Hatshepsut of Ancient Egypt. She has a lovely smile for someone who’s been dead for thousands of years.

she wasn’t a queen. she was a pharaoh and wanted to be referred to as such. she even had her statues modeled after the male pharaoh’s statues to state her dominance and authority. she was actually one of the most successful pharaohs in all of ancient egyptian history and she reigned longer than any other woman in power in egypt.

damn no wonder she died and smiled for a trillion years afterwards

The fact that we know about her is marvelous.

the next Pharaoh after her Tuthmosis III  tried to erase Hatshepsut out of history ,chiseled her name off her monuments ,covered the text on her obelisks with stone,knocked down and defaced her statues .

she was even left off the list of pharaohs ..talk about some patriarchy bullshit

her name was lost for a couple of millennia, her body was found in a unmarked grave  in early twentieth century

sad part is in Egyptian belief is  if your are forgotten in the living world you don’t exist in the afterlife,so he was trying to kill her even in death 

My best friend throwing down some herstory. A+ commentary

She wore a fake beard, you guys.
She was the fucking boss.

If we remember her now does that save her from an awful afterlife?

I’m just picturing the Kemetic afterlife. All the Pharaohs are hanging out in some kind of swanky club, drinking and congratulating each other on being bros. 

The doors slam open and Hatshepsut strides in, glorious, robes swirling, rocking the fake beard and the insane amounts of wealth and power. “Miss me, bitches?” 

this post was amazing from start to finish

(Source: xxerlflynn)

Unlikely simultaneous historical events

simhasanam:

quantumblog:

jkottke:

A poster on Reddit asks: What are two events that took place in the same time in history but don’t seem like they would have?

Spain was still a fascist dictatorship when Microsoft was founded.

There were no classes in calculus in Harvard’s…

After the 1941 Pearl Harbor attacks…Fred Korematsu challenged President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Executive Order 9066 that authorized the U.S. military to forcibly remove more than 120,000 people, mostly of Japanese descent, from their homes and into incarceration camps throughout the country. Two-thirds of these people were American citizens. Mr. Korematsu went into hiding in the Oakland area, becoming a fugitive, and was arrested and convicted of violating the federal order. His case went all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court.

On Jan. 30, the White House issued a statement honoring the legacy of Fred Korematsu.

(Source: thesmithian)