pocketfulofgeek:

This does not bode well.

pocketfulofgeek:

This does not bode well.

marvellised:

Captain America: The First Avenger end credits

Oh god, look at the colors here and compare them to the end credits of Cap 2.

I don’t need these feelings. PLEASE TO BE TAKING THEM AWAY.

petrosko:

floating candles in Great Hall Hogwarts - paper towel tubes and LED candles :D

petrosko:

floating candles in Great Hall Hogwarts - paper towel tubes and LED candles :D

virtual-artifacts:

Finial in the Form of a Parrot 
Object Name: Finial
Date: 17th–18th century
Geography: Northern India
Culture: Islamic
Medium: Brass

virtual-artifacts:

Finial in the Form of a Parrot

Object Name: Finial

Date: 17th–18th century

Geography: Northern India

Culture: Islamic

Medium: Brass

itwillriseinperfectlight:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?
Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.
English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 
This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 
A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 
Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 


Thank you. With only Art Appreciation 101 to fall back on, I could still tell you that everything about that billboard was set up to make the boy the focal point.

itwillriseinperfectlight:

urulokid:

millika:

Who’s Alex?

Billboard demonstrating gender stereotypes as most people automatically assume that Alex is the boy.

Actually, I’ve studied design and advertising, and I can tell you that the reason people would look at this and immediately assume Alex is the boy is because, quite simply, the boy is the focal point of the ad.

English-speaking readers’ line of sight goes from left to right and up to down. This ad leads the viewer from the words MEET ALEX etc straight to the boy and then over and down to the girl. I didn’t even notice there was a set of parenthesis with words in them in the ad until I looked the fourth time. 

This is a fallacious confirmation bias, as anyone looking at it will assume Alex is the focal point (i.e. The Boy) and then if they’re perceptive they’ll notice the words at the bottom. Aha! Those damn gender stereotypes gotcha again! Except no, because the ad literally forces you to read it as “Alex is the boy” by the visual language and lines of sight. 

A better ad would have been structured from top to bottom instead of left to right, and wouldn’t have pushed the girl, the real subject of the ad (who, by the way, has been VISUALLY PUSHED OUT OF HER RIGHTFUL SPACE ON THE AD BY HER BROTHER) off to the corner as far away from her identifiers as possible. 

Here, I’ll make you a better ad.

image

Bam. Shitty stock photo but you get the point. If anyone sees this and assumes Alex is the boy, they don’t have the the ad layout to use as an excuse for their internalized gender shittery. Likewise, the ad isn’t actively trying to make you read it a certain way and THEN making you feel guilty for interpreting it the way they designed it to be. 

Thank you. With only Art Appreciation 101 to fall back on, I could still tell you that everything about that billboard was set up to make the boy the focal point.

drstrangeloves:

thefabulousweirdtrotters:

Art by painter, sculptor, woodcarver Vyacheslav Pakhomov.

bent-but-not-broken13 godbait

drstrangeloves:

thefabulousweirdtrotters:

Art by painter, sculptor, woodcarver Vyacheslav Pakhomov.

bent-but-not-broken13 godbait
peter-pans-booty-shorts:


thenimbus:

dustymarshmellow:

…that’s surprisingly pleasing…

Kind of mystified right now…

I want one


I’m not saying it actually would weaken the stability of the structure (because it wouldn’t have to), but the impression of the possibility of it is enough to make me anxious.

peter-pans-booty-shorts:

thenimbus:

dustymarshmellow:

…that’s surprisingly pleasing…

Kind of mystified right now…

I want one

I’m not saying it actually would weaken the stability of the structure (because it wouldn’t have to), but the impression of the possibility of it is enough to make me anxious.

(Source: best-of-memes)

wetheurban:

FASHION: Insane Floral Fashion Illustrations by Grace Ciao

This is nuts. Meet Singaporean fashion illustrator, Grace Ciao. Her mind-blowing designs are biblically, insanely well put together using just flowers. 

Read More

everythingscenic:

Eurydice. Melpomene Katakalos.

Mandell Weiss Forum, UCSD

someoneinjersey:

qualiachameleon:

rocketumbl:

Theo Jansen  Strandbeest

Side note: These don’t have motors. They’re completely momentum/wind-powered and literally just wander around beaches unsupervised like giant abstract monsters.

NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE